I’ve been thinking about this, and I’m guessing the answer to my question may be very simple: we don’t approach writing as a business. We typically see our book as inspired art, a handcrafted masterpiece made from parts of our soul, or perhaps our best chance to minister to others. And we become focused on getting this marvelous creation into print so that as many other people as possible can enjoy it with us and benefit from what it says. What we don’t do, either because we just don’t see it or because we don’t even want o go there, is to see our book as a product, and publishing as a business.


In this webinar, I share some key elements I’ve learned over the years that will help writers or aspiring understand the big picture. In the future, I’ll be going into a lot more detail on all of these things.   Download a free 2-page pdf that will help you remember the 10 Essentials Note: These


Before you send a manuscript to an editor, an agent, or the person who does your layout, there are some things you can do to make sure that everything is as it should be. Many new writers and even some more experienced ones aren’t aware of things like hidden characters, using one space between sentences


While editing pieces for the Hot Apple Cider books, I discovered that a lot of people either have never used MS Word Track Changes, or only have a vague idea of how it works. While I definitely don’t know everything about it myself, I think I do know enough to help someone else get started.


A short time ago, I had a free ebook on Kindle. “They Can’t take That Away From Me,” It’s a short story, under my alter ego’s name (J. A. Menzies), and it’s not quite like anything else I’ve written. Closer to thriller than mystery. I thought I’d use this as a jumping-off place to talk


Every writer needs a place to keep his or her ideas, and a place to write. In this video, I share a few tips I’ve learned about organizing to write over the years. Download a free 3-page pdf that will help you figure out what to do with your space. Here’s another blog I wrote


Don’t let your readers get lost! A couple of weeks ago I mentioned that many writers sort of assume that the reader knows who is telling the story, especially if it’s telling a true story. If you haven’t read that post, you might want to read it first. As I said then, assuming your readers


A friend of a friend contacted me recently wanting to know how to turn her life story into a book. Since I realized there might be other people with the same question, I decided to post my reply here. In general, there are 4 options: 1. You write out your story so that you can


Assuming the reader knows who you are is one of the most common mistakes I see both in personal stories and fiction. When using the first person point of view, many writers just start telling the story, assuming that the reader knows who “I” is. I mean, the writer knows who “I” is, so why


At a recent conference, where I was taking pitches and doing critiques, I was reminded of some of the most common problems of new and even not-so-new writers. I ended up getting a copy of this book from the bookstore and recommending it to a number of people. Some of them are writing fiction. Some


I’ve been writing since I was tiny. And over the years, I’ve probably made every mistake possible. Okay, maybe not every mistake. But a whole lot of them! Plus I have a medal in English, and I taught English in a high school. So I know a little bit about good writing and grammar and


Yesterday, on my personal website, I posted a character sketch of my “hero” Glen Sauten, the protagonist of my first published book, The Best of Friends. If you’re writing fiction, you might want to check it out. The truth is, I broke two key writing rules when I wrote the book, and yet it still


Honestly, if all we had to write with were notepads and typewriters, I’d be the most frustrated writer alive. I love technology and all the things it helps me do! So here are the 10 tools I’d have great difficulty living without. 1. Multiple computer screens I’ve only had two screens for a couple of


Yesterday, on my main website/blog, I posted my writing goals for 2014, along with some details on how I plan to achieve them. While the post was about me and my goals, I also added some information that I think might be of benefit to other writers. I went beyond goals to break down how


Most of the time when new writers tell me they’ve written a book, what they actually mean is that they’ve completed a first draft of a book. And my advice is, “Don’t rush off to find a publisher for a first draft.” So, if you’re in that boat, what would I suggest you do? 1.


When you write an essay, article, or non-fiction book, you normally have a specific idea you want to get across (very similar to the theme or thesis you have when you write an essay). Many writers have an idea they want to get across. However, unless you’re writing a teaching article with three easy points,


Many writers get ideas from listening to the news, reading newspapers or the internet, watching programs about current affairs, noticing topics that are trending… In fact, being alert to what’s going on in the world is usually a great way to get started as a writer. Many local or regional newspapers are interested in stories


No time to get a blog ready for today because I was working like a crazy person on book trailers. However, one of the ways to learn how to write well is to study good writing, so perhaps you might be interested in listening to me read the openings of nine of the 51 pieces