Honestly, if all we had to write with were notepads and typewriters, I’d be the most frustrated writer alive. I love technology and all the things it helps me do! So here are the 10 tools I’d have great difficulty living without. 1. Multiple computer screens I’ve only had two screens for a couple of


Most of the time when new writers tell me they’ve written a book, what they actually mean is that they’ve completed a first draft of a book. And my advice is, “Don’t rush off to find a publisher for a first draft.” So, if you’re in that boat, what would I suggest you do? 1.


Yes, you are allowed to steal ideas. That’s because you can’t copyright an idea. And what I would do with an idea might be very different from what you would do with it. Now, there are some common sense boundaries. If I tell you I’m going to query a specific editor about an article on


Is your current work space in chaos? If so, take some quality time to just sit and think about what works best for you. I remember when our kids were small. We wanted them to set the table and empty the dishwasher when it was clean. But they weren’t tall enough to reach the cupboard


The moment you have several ideas down on pieces of paper, you need some files. Not a lot of them. You might start with only five or six. You can easily buy a small metal holder with half a dozen or so coloured folders in it. Mark the blue folder Nonfiction Ideas, the red one


Over the years, I can’t begin to estimate how much time I’ve wasted looking for things I’ve misplaced—slips of papers with ideas on them, contracts, books, emails… You name it, I’ve misplaced it. And I’ve spent hours and hours and hours searching for something, only to have it turn up shortly after I stopped looking


If you’ve been in one of my workshops where I talk about writing fiction, I usually hand out small cards with these words on them: character, setting, plot, theme. For me, they are the four corners of all good fiction. But when you begin a story, you usually have only of these things: a character


Is your goal for being on Twitter to convince me to buy your product? If you said yes, it’s okay. However, my question for you is this: “What if I’ve already done it?” I’ve either bought your product or checked it out and decided it really isn’t for me. Now what? If all you do,


Coming purely from the perspective of a “Follower” on Twitter, my last two posts have addressed some of the things that make me “unfollow” people. Here are some short random things I hate, most of which will make me eventually unfollow you. 1. Posting quotations from other people (usually famous) with no explanation as to


Yesterday I talked about how to improve your chances of selling me something on Twitter. Today it’s about using links. And why I don’t like being told what to do. Okay, I get it. You want me do something (read this, buy this, look at this, etc.). But all too often, you don’t tell me


I’ve been on Twitter pretty well since it began in 2006. And most of the time, I love Twitter. I use it to follow people or businesses or teams that I’m actually interested in. I find it cool that I can sometimes connect with someone who I’d never have a chance to connect with otherwise.