I’ve been thinking about this, and I’m guessing the answer to my question may be very simple: we don’t approach writing as a business. We typically see our book as inspired art, a handcrafted masterpiece made from parts of our soul, or perhaps our best chance to minister to others. And we become focused on getting this marvelous creation into print so that as many other people as possible can enjoy it with us and benefit from what it says. What we don’t do, either because we just don’t see it or because we don’t even want o go there, is to see our book as a product, and publishing as a business.


We’ve all been there. The proud parents show off their new baby and your first impression is that it’s really quite ugly. Like me, you’ve probably stuttered a little before forcing out something like, “My! Isn’t that a baby?” Unfortunately, I’ve had a similar experience when some proud authors have shown me their new “babies”—their


Most of the time when new writers tell me they’ve written a book, what they actually mean is that they’ve completed a first draft of a book. And my advice is, “Don’t rush off to find a publisher for a first draft.” So, if you’re in that boat, what would I suggest you do? 1.